Graphite 2006 - Graphite 2006 - Keynote Speaker [Terrance Masson]

 

4th International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques
in Australasia and South-East Asia
29 November - 2 December 2006 · Kuala Lumpur

     
  DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER GRAPHICS & MULTIMEDIA :: FSKSM :: UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MALAYSIA

 

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Invited Speakers

| Badlisham Ghazali | Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann | Alan Chalmers | Terrence Masson |

Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann, MiraLab Geneva

Terrance Masson

Computer Animation Festival Chair for SIGGRAPH 2006 (Boston)

Biography

Over the past 17 years, Terrence Masson has served the film and computer graphics community with inspiring production leadership, innovative creative techniques and technical problem solving. After earning his BFA (Graphic Design and Art History) from The University of Massachusetts in 1989 Terrence spent his early years in New York and Boston in graphic design, commercial flying logos, large format and interactive projects; specializing in camera and lighting.

Since founding his own consulting company Digital Fauxtography Inc. in 1994 Terrence has built and led teams ranging in size from six to sixty. Major studio collaborations have included founding positions at The Trumbull Company (1992), Digital Domain (1993) and Warner Brothers (1994), consulting to Sony Pictures Imageworks (1995) and Dreamworks (2003) and two tours at Industrial Light + Magic (1991 and 1996-2000). Terrence also single-handily created the original CG animation and rendering techniques to launch South Park the television series in 1996.

As an independent VFX Supervisor and Senior Technical Director he has contributed to over 20 major film projects including Fantastic Four, Hook, True Lies, The Star Wars Trilogy Special Edition, Spawn, Batman Forever, Small Soldiers and Star Wars Episode I: Phantom Menace. Large format projects include Luxor for Doug Trumbull and Mars Odyssey for Simex. His many national commercial projects include the original Bud Frogs (1995) for Digital Domain and the award winning Dodge Molecule for ILM-Commercials. Terrence has also directed real-time hardware graphics for major titles such as Bruce Lee: Quest of the Dragon for Universal Interactive, SimCity4 for Maxis/EA and Batman: Dark Tomorrow for Kemco/Japan.

As an award winning Animation Director his short animated films (most recently Bunkie & Booboo) have been featured in festivals worldwide. As an author, his book “CG 101: A Computer Graphics Industry Reference” offers a unique historical and practical look into our industry. His numerous articles for VFXPro.com (a site he co-founded as visualfx.com in 1995) cover a wide range of visual effects topics. Terrence is a much sought after lecturer and has spoken at dozens of animation festivals, conferences and universities around the world on a wide range of topics.

Terrence is a long time member and supporter of both the Visual Effects Society and ACM/SIGGRAPH. He is currently the Computer Animation Festival Chair for SIGGRAPH 2006.

Talk Title

"How To Avoid Box-Office Failure: The Top 5 things that will doom your Animation Production"

The goal of any animation project should of course be to maximize the amount of energy onto the creative; especially story development, production design, animation and cinematography. But a successful creative production is only possible with the coordination of many details both large and small. The failure of any one of these areas can easily doom your project. With so much collective worldwide production experience these mistakes should be easy to avoid, yet they are constantly repeated. Ever increasing competition in present and future of animation will not allow for the continuation of un-optimized, poor animation production. The budgets and risk for feature animated film production is especially vulnerable to inefficiencies that sap creative energy while fueling cost overruns

 

 
Copyright 2006, Department of Computer Graphics & Multimedia, Faculty of Computer Science & Information System, UTM